Phase 1: Examine the problem

Prerequisites for this phase:

This phase often involves the whole team around the kitchen table, after a few client meetings and some background research.

Outcomes:

Phase 2: Understand the objectives

Prerequisites for this phase:

The designer explores ways design can set the tone for the intended project goal. This may include suggested typography, colour/ tone, patterns, imagery, techniques, interactions, form, materials. These are presented to the client for feedback and iteration.

Outcomes may include:

Phase 3: Ideation

Prerequisites for this phase:

With a clearly defined conceptual and visual problem to solve, the designer gets to work on the solution. This stage is a lot like preparing a garden. The designer turns over old, dry ideas to find fresh new stuff. But instead of a hoe, they use tools that are prolific and lend well to non-linear thinking. The best idea is presented to the client.

Outcomes may include:

Phase 4: Experiment

Prerequisites for this phase:

We test ways to implement the idea, iterating as we go. The point is to learn from mistakes and get them out of the way, so quick and dirty is essential. Feedback from the client is invaluable during this phase.

Outcomes may include:

Phase 5: Design

Prerequisites for this phase:

While you might think amazing design should naturally take a long time, the acual rendering of the project can often be the shortest phase. With all the unknowns solved, the designer can 100% focus on the details of the craft.

Outcomes may include:

Phase 6: Pre-press, Post-production

Prerequisites for this phase:

If it were up to the designer, nothing would ever be published, posted or installed. They're perfectionists at heart, and at the very least insist on this final sweep for quality control. The client and a few extra pairs of eyes from our team are pulled in.

Outcomes may include:

Tools

Best Practices for Designers